10 Up-and-Coming Yaoi Artists that Will Wow You #NSFW

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The proliferation of up-and-coming Yaoi manga artists on Twitter and Instagram portends an exciting future of the genre as the myriad artists and fans are range from South Korean, Laotian, and Filipino to Brazilians, Australians, South Africans, and more.

It’s fascinating how these diverse, international cohorts may not speak English, but capture pure Americana in their themes.

FOX BRAVO

For the uninitiated, Yaoi is a Japanese term, also known by the wasei-eigo construction boys’ love (BL) is a genre of comic-books or manga, that originated in Japan featuring romantic homoerotic relationships and often a lot of kinky sex.

Historically, Yaoi was created by women for women and was strikingly distinct from homoerotic manga marketed to gay men, although it still attracts a male audience and produced by male creators.

Bioluminescence date with the fishboy

Yaoi spans a wide range of media, including manga, anime, video games, television series, films, and fan works.

“Ebitendo” has been updated! “[R18] Happy New Year” The first update of this year is to deliver the naughty milk of the milk god who is familiar with New Year’s cards!

In Japan and much of Asia the genre is  categorized by the terms “Boys’ love” and “BL”  and though the terms are used by some fans and commentators in the West — yaoi remains more generally prevalent in English, particularly the United States.

The Devil and S-13

The genre originated in the 1970s as a subgenre of shōjo manga, or comics for girls. Several terms were used for the new genre, including shōnen-ai (少年愛lit. “boy love”), tanbi (耽美lit. “aestheticism”), and June (ジュネ[d͡ʑu͍ ne]). The term yaoi emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s in the context of dōjinshi (同人誌, self-published works) culture as a portmanteau of yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi (“no climax, no point, no meaning”), where it was used in self-deprecating manner to refer to amateur fan works that focused on sex to the exclusion of plot and character development, and that often parodied mainstream manga and anime by depicting male characters from popular series in sexual scenarios. “Boys’ love” was later adopted by Japanese publications in the 1990s as an umbrella term for male-male romance media marketed to women.

 

Above: Sheltered together. (@tnkisu)

Concepts and themes associated with yaoi include androgynous men known as bishōnen; diminished female characters; narratives that emphasize homosociality and de-emphasize socio-cultural homophobia; and depictions of rape. A defining characteristic of yaoi is the practice of pairing characters in relationships according to the roles of seme, the sexual top or active pursuer, and uke, the sexual bottom or passive pursued. Yaoi has a robust global presence, having spread since the 1990s through international licensing and distribution, as well as through unlicensed circulation of works by yaoi fans online. Yaoi works, culture, and fandom have been studied and discussed by scholars and journalists worldwide.

Before 1970: The origins of shōnen-ai

Homosexuality and androgyny have a history in Japan dating to ancient times, as seen in practices such as shudō (衆道, same-sex love between samurai and their companions) and kagema (陰間, male sex workers who served as apprentice kabuki actors).

The country shifted away from a tolerance of homosexuality amid Westernization during the Meiji Era (1868-1912), and moved towards hostile social attitudes towards homosexuality and the implementation of anti-sodomy laws.

Birthday Cake – TodoBaku Fluff (@ainudraws)

In the face of this legal and cultural shift, artists who depicted male homosexuality in their work typically did so through subtext.

Illustrations by Kashō Takabatake in the shōnen manga (boys’ comics) magazine Nihon Shōnen formed the foundation of what would become the aesthetic of bishōnen (lit. “beautiful boy”): boys and young men, often in homosocial or homoerotic contexts, who are defined by their “ambivalent passivity, fragility, ephemerality, and softness.”

The 1961 novel A Lovers’ Forest by tanbi writer Mari Mori, which follows the relationship between a professor and his younger male lover, is regarded as an influential precursor to the shōnen-ai genre.

 Mori’s works were influenced by European literature, particularly Gothic literature, and laid the foundation for many of the common tropes of shōnen-ai and yaoi: western exoticism, educated and wealthy characters, significant age differences among couples, and fanciful or even surreal settings.[11]

In manga, the concept of gekiga (劇画) emerged in the late 1950s, which sought to use manga to tell serious and grounded stories aimed at adult audiences. Gekiga inspired the creation of manga that depicted realistic human relationships, and opened the way for manga that explored human sexuality in a non-pornographic context.

Hideko Mizuno‘s 1969 shōjo manga (girls’ comics) series Fire! (1969–1971), which eroticized its male protagonists and depicted male homosexuality in American rock and roll culture, is noted as an influential work in this regard.[35]

Contemporary Japanese homoerotic romance manga originated in the 1970s as a subgenre of shōjo manga.

The decade saw the arrival of a new generation of shōjo manga artists, most notable among them the Year 24 Group. The Year 24 Group contributed significantly to the development of the shōjo manga, introducing a greater diversity of themes and subject material to the genre that drew inspiration from by Japanese and European literature, cinema, and history.

Members of the group, including Keiko Takemiya and Moto Hagio, created works that depicted male homosexuality: In The Sunroom (1970) by Takemiya and The November Gymnasium (1971) by Hagio are considered the first works of the genre that would become known as shōnen-ai.[37]

The way I drew Dick makes him look like he’s sO in loVE (he is)

Takemiya, Hagio, Toshie KiharaRyoko Yamagishi, and Kaoru Kurimoto were among the most significant shōnen-ai artists of this era; notable works include The Heart of Thomas (1974–1975) by Hagio and Kaze to Ki no Uta (1976-1984) by Takemiya.

Works by these artists typically featured tragic romances between androgynous bishōnen in historic European settings.

Feelin’ adventurous at the park. (@maorenc)

Though these works were nominally aimed at an audience of adolescent girls and young women, they also attracted adult gay and lesbian readers.

During this same period, the first gay manga magazines were published: Barazoku, the first commercially-circulated gay men’s magazine in Japan, was published in 1971, and served as a major influence on Takemiya and the development of shōnen-ai.

Nothing compares to that charming and fraternal love…

The dōjinshi (self-published works) subculture emerged contemporaneously in the 1970s (see Media below), and in 1975, the first Comiket was held as a gathering of amateur artists who produce dōjinshi.[45] The term yaoi, initially used by some creators of male-male romance dōjinshi to describe their creations ironically, emerged to describe amateur works that were influenced by shōnen-ai and gay manga.

Early yaoi dōjinshi produced for Comiket were typically derivative works, with American glam rock artists such as David Bowie and Queen as popular subjects as a result of the influence of Fire!; yaoi dōjinshi were also more sexually explicit than shōnen-ai.

Big brother Grayson. #NSFW #Bara #Gay #Yaoi

In reaction to the success of shōnen-ai and early yaoi, publishers sought to exploit the market by creating magazines devoted to the genre. Publishing house Magazine Magazine, which published the gay manga magazine Sabu, launched the magazines June in 1978 and Allan in 1980.

Both magazines initially specialized in shōnen-ai, which the publisher described as “halfway between tanbi literature and pornography.”

In addition to manga, June and Allan published articles on homosexuality, literary fiction, illustrations, and amateur yaoi works.

The success of June was such that the term June-mono or more simply June began to compete with the term shōnen-ai to describe works depicting male homosexuality.

Damian was so busy helping his dad fight crime that he forgot to jack off for two weeks! Now was finally his chance to have some solo fun. Trouble is, he forgot Jon was coming over

 

By the late 1980s, the popularity of professionally published shōnen-ai was declining, and yaoi published as dōjinshi was becoming more popular. Mainstream shōnen manga with Japanese settings such as Captain Tsubasa became popular source material for derivative works by yaoi creators, and the genre increasingly depicted Japanese settings over western settings.

Works influenced by shōnen-ai in the 1980s began to depict older protagonists and adopted a realist style in both plot and artwork, as typified by manga such as Banana Fish (1985–1994) by Akimi Yoshida and Tomoi (1986) by Wakuni Akisato.

1990s: Mainstream popularity and yaoi ronsō

The manga artist group Clamp, whose works were among the first yaoi-influenced media to be encountered by Western audiences.

The growing popularity of yaoi attracted the attention of manga magazine editors, many of whom recruited yaoi dōjinshi authors to their publications; Zetsuai 1989 (1989–1991) by Minami Ozaki, a yaoi series published in the shōjo magazine Margaret, was originally a Captain Tsubasa dōjinshi created by Ozaki that she adapted into an original work.

By 1990, seven Japanese publishers included yaoi content in their offerings, which kickstarted the commercial publishing market of the genre.

Between 1990 and 1995, thirty magazines devoted to yaoi were established: Magazine Be × Boy, founded in 1993, became one of the most influential yaoi manga magazines of this era. The manga in these magazines were influenced by realist stories like Banana Fish, and moved away from the shōnen-ai standards of the 1970s and 1980s.

Shōnen-ai works that were published during this period were typically comedies rather than melodramas, such as Gravitation (1996–2002) by Maki Murakami.

Consequently, yaoi and “boys’ love” (BL) came to be the most popular terms to describe works depicting male-male romance, eclipsing shōnen-ai and June.

The mid-1990s saw the so-called “yaoi debate” or yaoi ronsō (や お い 論争), a debate held primarily in a series of essays published in the feminist magazine Choisir from 1992 to 1997.

In an open letter, Japanese gay writer Masaki Satou criticized the genre as homophobic for not depicting gay men accurately, heterosexist by reinforcing the misogyny of Japanese society, and called fans of yaoi “disgusting women” who “have a perverse interest in sexual intercourse between men.”

A years-long debate ensued, with yaoi fans and artists contending that yaoi is entertainment for women that does not seek to be a realistic depiction of homosexuality, and instead serves as a refuge from the misogyny of Japanese society.

The scholarly debate that the yaoi ronsō engendered led to the formation of the field of “BL studies”, which focus on the study of BL and the relationship between women and BL.

 It additionally impacted creators of yaoi: author Kurihara Chiyo abandoned yaoi to focus on heterosexual pornography as a result of the yaoi ronsō, while Takamatsu Hisako took into account the arguments of the genre’s critics to create works more accommodating of a gay audience.

The economic crisis caused by the Lost Decade came to affect the manga industry in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but did not particularly impact the yaoi market; on the contrary, yaoi magazines continued to proliferate during this period, and sales of yaoi media increased.

In 2004, Otome Road in Ikebukuro emerged as a major cultural destination for yaoi fandom, with multiple stores dedicated to shōjo and yaoi goods.

The 2000s also saw an increase in male readers of yaoi, with a 2008 bookstore survey finding that between 25 and 30 percent of yaoi readers were male.

Above: Working up a sweat. (@ruisselait)

The 2000s saw significant growth of yaoi in international markets, beginning with the founding of the American anime convention Yaoi-Con in 2001.

The first officially-licensed English-language translations of yaoi manga were published in the North American market in 2003 (see Media below);  the market expanded rapidly before contracting in 2008 as a result of the global financial crisis of 2007–2008, but continued to grow slowly in the following years.

South Korea saw the development of BL in the form of manhwa, notably Martin and John (2006) by Park Hee Jung and Crush on You (2006) by Lee Kyung Ha.

Every yaoi ever:

Guy 1: Heh. Me gay? Never.

Guy 1 after 5 pages: Damn that dude is SO HOT.

Guy 2 after 10 pages: O-ow. your penis in my butt kinda hurts.

Guy 2 after 11 pages: I seriously can’t get enough penis in my butt.

EZREAL #LeagueOfLegends #Ezreal #WildRift he hates me for this

TEN TO WATCH

3 AM Cheesecake

threeway

 

[Fire Emblem Echoes] Gray fucks Tobin (RessoLatibello)

Bulge Squared (Artist : Twitter @Torakitchen)

Experimenting with make-up on Pride.

(IG: @rio__jageyama)

 

Tired after a good game. (@ainudraws)

 

I HATE THIS GAME Unless I’m getting paid for it on Chaturbate.

Umbrella beach fun.

FEMBOY HOOTERS

TWO HORNY BROS

Heart Racing (Gif version)(@shibayuji003)

Heart Racing (Gif version)(@shibayuji003) from r/yaoi

Taking his little brother.

Bisexuals are valid

 

HAPPY ENDING Yuji Itadori’s “Leaked Masturbation Video” (Full Animation Preview)(Shiba Yuji aka @shibayuji003)

Dangerous Convenience Store

Yeo Eui Joon trudges through each day working at the local convenience tore who works at a convenience store frequented by gangsters, wants to quit as soon as possible because of the dangerous work environment. However, he’s stopped by the pay that’s 1.2x more than other stores! So, Eui Joon, who needs every penny he can get, overlooks the danger and continues working there. Then one day, Bum Geon Woo, who looks more like a gangster than any other gangsters show up. And as soon as he appears, the other gangsters simmer down… Will Eui Joon be able to safely continue working at this convenience store?

Read it here.